Thursday, March 02, 2006

Lebanon: To Be Or Not To Be?

It's not Lausanne, not Taif, not in Damascus, nor in Cairo...It's in Beirut where the Lebanese leaders are meeting to determine the fate of our country. This is new. And interestingly, it's in the heart of Beirut, that heart that was flattened during the war, where they are meeting to determine that fate.

Will they come out with a document that paves the way for instituting the Third Republic? Or will they agree to finally and at last fulfill the mandates of the Taif Agreement that brought about our Second Republic?

Many questions; the fate of this country does rest on the outcome of this meeting. If this meeting fails, we have much to lose. What will the leaders who supposedly represent us decide? Will they decide to agree and save this country or will they disagree and then what?...we enter into the unknown?

And if this meeting fails, it will be even more depressing to see that perhaps Lebanon as a country, as a nation, is a failed idea. Because when the Lebanese are sitting face-to-face without foreign interference on Lebanese soil, they cannot agree on the basics?! Then what is the message we are sending to ourselves and to the world? Then why would anyone be on our side and why should I continue carrying the banner of Lebanon?

But of course if those leaders dialoguing right now come out with a positive outcome, it will be truely a "victory", even if it was symbolic, that Lebanon can be.

We can make fun of the characters taking part in this dialogue; we can mock the dialogue itself as much as we want, but I believe that history will only tell that what Lebanon is undergoing is historical indeed and worth witnessing in earnest.

On a lighter note: Check it out this picture from today's meeting:

"Nobody knows how many rebellions, besides political rebellions, ferment in the masses of life which people earth."


Ms Levantine said...

We are going to find out if our leaders are more interested in self-preservation or in being good public servants doing what is best for their fellow citizens. I am holding my breath (not really).

Anonymous said...

The outcomes of these meetings mean nothing and mean everything. We the people have the final say to what outcome we wish to adopt. If I fail, you fail. If you fail, I fail. I hope we can get this concept imbedded in the thick skulls of our compatriots.

Raja said...


I am not so sure about your second sentence... but I definitely like what you said about failure!

In Lebanon, the popular belief is that if you fail, I win! You don't only see that in politics and political sentiments, but you also see it in business practices - more specifically the relationship between buyer and seller.

If I fail, you win!

Anonymous said...

again, vote nick samara for president!!!!pass it around!!

Raja said...


you'll solve all our problems nick!

all of them!

AbdulKarim said...

I don't think there will be a failure even when there is no agreement, for Berri said that in that case there will be an agreement on the mechanism to solve the unresolved issues. Seems to me that it is a pre-emptive step by Berri to deal with the possibility of failed dialogue. But what would happen then if they even failed to agree on a dispute resolution mechanism ?

AbdulKarim said...

As for the picture Doha, I think Saad Hariri had a role in planning this hand shake. He met Jounblat yesterday as well as Nasrallah for 7 hours.

frencheagle said...

well it s just a warlord and mafia meeting to divide the power btw them again ...

what is the progress? where is the population's will ?

Anonymous said...

To the Lebanese abroad who believe Lahoud should resign, Please sign the online petition.

frencheagle said...

this petition is USELESS, as far lahoud can just be pushed out through accusing him of betraying the country.

to do so, we should consider syria as a foreign enemi which would lead to most of the leaders, IE berry, the future people, joumblatt and even geagea since he was in the government btw 90 to 92, nassib lahoud as his role as an ambassador in the UN in 90 etc... to prison for the same crime.

let them play with the rules! let them accuse lahoud of betrayal!

another thing if lahoud resigns all the decision that took place after 2004 are canceled, the legislative elections of 2005 are constituionnaly canceled.... addoum's resignation is canceled by law...

let them think twice about this before leading us back to the syrian occupation

the scenario i would encourage would be to
have a new electoral law
hold new elections
have a new speaker, new governement
and then having lahoud's resignation

or to lead lahoud to high court

but both choices are not in the interest of the current fake majority, fake bcz elected through a law dating of the syrian occupation

Anonymous said...


Would Michel Aon make a good president?

why-discuss said...

The dialog may work in appearance because no group will take a stand that would make it appear as responsible for the failure. The question is to see if there will be an action plan or just vague promises that would fade after the shake hands and big smiles...
I count on Aoun who has set up a structured agreement with the Hezb to insist of some kind of a road map with checkpoints, deadlines and a structure to follow up.. But Lebanese political leaders have never been able to follow up anything in a consistent way (Taif is a good example of an agreement with no imbedded structure for follow-up that eventually stagnated) Would they come up with something that will stand the shocks of the geopolitical tremors (Irak, Hamas etc..) or be quickly forgotten?

frencheagle said...

@ anonymous

well what are the alternatives?

personnally i guess he is the best alternative among the candidates if u re reading what i wrote once just check that link
it s in french!87518942521B2CF2!1129.entry